Basic White Sourdough using 100% Hydration Starter

I have been working on some 100% starter hydration recipes.  A 100% hydration sourdough starter is a culture which is kept and fed with water and flour at equal weights. Like for instance 5 oz water to 5 oz flour. A 166% hydration starter is fed with equal volume of flour and water, which most typically is one cup of water (8.3 oz) and one cup of flour (5 oz).

A  lot of bakers keep their starter at 100% hydration and so here is a recipe for a basic white sourdough bread using the 100% starter:

Basic White Sourdough

In the afternoon mix together by hand or mixer:

  1. 100% hydration sourdough starter – 16 oz/453g
  2. Water – 18 oz/510g
  3. Bread flour – 32 oz/907g
  4. Oil – .5 oz/14g
  5. Sugar – .5 oz/14g
  6. Sea Salt – .8 oz/22g (Don’t add salt until after autolyse- see below)

Mix ingredients together until well incorporated. Allow dough to set for 20 minutes to rest (this is called autolyse). After autolyse, add salt and knead the dough in the bowl until the salt is well mixed in. Cover your dough and let it ferment for 4 – 6 hours or until it feels spongy and well developed.

During the fermentation time, fold the dough int the bowl once an hour. To fold dough, just take the edge of the dough and fold it over on itself, work around the bowl until you have folded over all sides.

After the ferment is done, shape your loaves. You will have 4 lbs 4 oz of dough at 65% hydration. You can divide this into two 2 lb loaves or four 1lb loaves.

Put your shaped dough into bannetons and cover them with plastic bags. Then refrigerate overnight. Next morning take out your dough staggering the loaves by 30 minutes so they are not all proofed at the same time. Let the dough warm up and finish it’s final proof.

This will take anywhere from one hour to three hours. When it looks like the loaf has one hour of proofing left, turn your oven on to 450F degrees and preheat it with a baking stone inside, for one hour. 10 minutes before you will bake your first loaf, preheat a roasting pan lid in the oven.

When the dough is done proofing, turn out your loaf and slash the top, then slide the dough onto a peel which has been sprinkled with semolina flour. Slide the dough onto the hot stone, spray the loaf all over with water, then place the hot roasting lid over the dough. Close the oven door and bake for 20 minutes.

After 20 minutes, take off the roasting lid to allow the crust to crisp up and brown. Bake for another 10 -15 minutes until the color is a nice deep color.  If you notice that the loaf is browning too fast, turn the oven down to 425 degrees for the last 10 -15 minutes of the bake.

Roasting lid baking:

Take out your beautiful loaf and cool on a cooling rack. Reheat the oven and then bake the next loaf. This bread is a very easy and delicious loaf, it goes well with almost anything and makes terrific sandwiches and toast.

This post will be sent to Susan at Yeast Spotting.

I also wanted to give notice that there are more variety of starters available in the store now if you have been waiting for one of the rye starters or need a new white starter, check it out: Sourdough Store . There are a variety of starter from around the world available.

Have fun baking!!

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25 Responses

  1. CAN I REPLACE THE SUGAR IN THE RECIPE WITH AN EQUAL AMOUNT OF BARLEY MALT POWDER?

    TONY

  2. If it is diastatic malt it would be too much. If it is non diastatic malt, I think the substitution is half.

  3. I WAS CONSIDERING DIASTATIC MALT POWDER — SO USE MAYBE 1 TEASPOON?

    THANKS,

    TONY

    • Hi Tony, the amount of diastatic malt used is up to .5% of the flour weight. In this recipe that would be .2 oz or about 2 teaspoons. Check your flour first to see if there is already malt added before adding more. Teresa

  4. I WAS CONSIDERING DIASTATIC MALT POWDER — SO MAYBE USE 1 TEASPOON?

    THANKS,

    TONY

  5. Hello Teresa!

    Re: the 100% hydration starter, do you notice a discernable flavor improvement using this? I prefer the wetter starter for handling ease–it’s so much easier to get out of my storage container, and to mix together! But I do wonder about flavor. Thanks for any feedback you can give me…

    Patty

  6. […] Basic White Sourdough […]

  7. Hi Patty, I need to work with the 100% hydration starter longer to determine any real differences.

  8. Those are beautiful loaves! I think I keep my starter at around 94% hydration just because I think the thicker mix is more tolerant of abuse. My poor starter gets neglected sometimes. 🙂 So I’m trying to find ways to use it more often.

  9. Thanks for explaining hydration. I’ve been over feeding my starter (I have to stop being stubborn about using measuring cups!)

  10. great site! thank you for providing more links to breadbakers out there

  11. I MADE THIS BREAD SEVERAL DAYS AGO AND I ALONG WITH MY WHOLE FAMILY THINK IT IS THE BEST I HAVE EVERMAD AND I HAVE BEEN BAKING FOR SEVERA; YEARS — THE DOUGH AS IT IS RISING IS BEAUTIFUL — IT PASSES THE WINDOWPANE TEST AT THE SECOND FOLD AND IS VERY FLEXIBLE AND SILKY LOOKING — I HAVE THREE LOAVES RETARDING RIGHT NOW AND WILL BAKE BEFORE NOON TOMORROW — THANKS SO MUCH FOR THE RECIPE AND ALSO THE ADVICE RE THE DIASTATIC MALT POWDER —

    TONY

  12. I want to get into making bread, and i have a sourdough starter, it is just that i don’t think that i have enough starter, does cutting the ingredients in half effect anything in the bread?

  13. Hello, excuse my poor english and knowledge on bread baking, but I don´t understand the first step “100% hydration sourdough starter – 16 oz/453g”: should I mix 453g of water and other 453g of flour to make this sourdough starter, plus the other ingredients?
    Best regards,
    Pascal.

  14. No, mix half of 453g as water and flour so it equals 453g when you are done. 453g is what you would measure out of your starter when it is ripe.

  15. […] Basic White Sourdough using 100% Hydration Starter […]

  16. I HAVE MADE THIS BREAD SEVERAL TIMES AND HAVE GOTTEN GREAT HELP FROM YOU TO MAKE IT BETTER —- NOW I HAVE ANOTHER QUESTION REGARDING THE STARTER — PRIOR TO MIXING THE DOUGH I TAKE THE STARTER OUT OF THE FRIDG., FEED IT AND THEN HOW LONG SHOULD I LET IT FERMENT BEFORE I PUT IT IN THE MIX — SOME TIMES I GET A GREAT RISE AND THEN OTHER TIMES I GET ONLY A FAIR RISE — HELP PLEASE AS THIS IS OUR FAVORITE — IT IS NEVER BAD BUT SOMETIMES BETTER THAN OTHERS — THANKS AGAIN FOR YOUR HELP —

    TONYK

    • Hi Tony, I do not keep my starter refrigerated, so I asked my Technical Administrator because he does, he said:

      “You have to wait until it is active. It can take several feedings. I usually feed two or three times with 8-12 hours between. It often depends on my schedule.”

      I hope this helps,

      Teresa

  17. WHEN YOU SAY COOK AT 450 F IS THAT WHERE YOU SET THE OVEN DIAL OR DO YOU USE AN OVEN THERMOMETER — I ASK BECAUSE MY OVEN TEMP. MEASURED WITH THERMOMETER WILL READ ABOUT 415 WHEN SET TO 450 AND I HAVE TURNED THE ADJUSTMENT UP AS FAR AS IT WILL GO — I HAVE AN ELECTRIC OVEN — THANKS AGAIN —

    TONYK

  18. Hi – I mixed a batch of this up this afternoon. It is extremely wet. I have added another cup of bread flour and it’s still a very wet sticky dough. Is this the way it should be?

    Thanks for your reply!

    Trish
    “Trishinomaha” from TFL

  19. 65% dough is wet, but not too wet, not too hard to handle unless you are used to 60%. Are you weighing your ingredients or using cup measures? The other problem I have had with dough being sticky when it shouldn’t be is when it is overfermented or the flour has gone bad. Teresa

  20. I AM STILL IN LOVE WITH THIS BREAD AND I NOW WANT TO ADD IN SOME CHEDDAR CHEESE AND CHOPPED AND POSSIBLY SAUTEED JALAPENO PEPPERS — SHOULD I ANTICIPATE PROBLEMS AND OF WHAT SORT? —

    THANKS AGAIN,

    TONYK

  21. Hi Tony, it should work fine, chunk your cheese large enough so it doesn’t melt into the bread but leaves big gooey holes filled with melted cheese!

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