Motherdough White Loaves

 
 
 
 

Motherdough White Loaf

Motherdough White Loaf

 

 

I have been working with a Motherdough starter at 70% hydration. A Motherdough starter is any starter that you bring to 70% (or any lower hydration from 50 – 80 %) hydration and keep refrigerated for at least 2 – 3 days until use. I used Northwest Sourdough Starter for this recipe. The long cold fermentation brings a  new dimension to your sourdough baking. The crust of a bread made with Motherdough is usually reddish brown, the crumb is soft and the taste is somewhat mild, although you can use techniques to have a more tangy flavor. The long ferment also helps bring out a blistery crust. If you want to make some Motherdough: Continue reading

Magnificent Sourdough

Jeremy's Baguette de Monde

Jeremy's Baguette de monge

If you haven’t noticed yet, I have added a new page to my blog. It is called Magificent Sourdough. I felt that what Susan at Wild Yeast was doing with her Yeast Spotting was a terrific idea and hoped to follow her example in spreading around the interest in baking. I am hoping to showcase Continue reading

Dough Never Forgets… Guess Which One!

Sourdough Soft Pan Loaves

Sourdough Soft Pan Loaves

I had an interesting thing happen last week when I made up some sourdough soft pan loaves. I made up the dough, shaped the loaves, and put the dough into the pans. However, I made a mistake. With most of the sourdough I bake, I use proofing baskets or bannetons. With them, you turn out your dough for baking, so when putting the dough into the banneton, you turn it upside down… see what happened

Pain Au Levain… Naturally Fermented French Bread

Pain Au Levain

Pain Au Levain

I received a new starter from a woman in Macairiere Boulogne, France. She wanted to remain nameless, but I do want to thank her for her wonderful French sourdough starter. I made the Pumpkin Sourdough in the preceeding blog with it. It is a midrange sour flavored,robust, five hour proofing starter (medium range proof). I thought it would be great to bake up some French Bread with it so I modified a formula from Raymond Calvels book “The Taste of Bread”. read more

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