Wheat Nubbins Loaves

Here is the bread I started in the earlier post. It is a lower hydration dough with sifted Whole Wheat flour, some sifted Rye flour and some boiled cracked wheat nubbins. I expect the crumb to be finer and I also put in the salt earlier this time to slow down the fermentation because my Northwest Starter is just bulk fermenting too fast for what I want at only 3- 4 hours and I want it more like six hours for that great long fermentation flavor. I also added melted butter and malt syrup for flavor and moistness. I am hoping to wet the crust and roll the dough in the part of the wheat that was sifted out, (the branny part) before slashing and baking. The dough is proofing right now in its finished shape and I will be baking it in about two more hours more or less. Or I might glaze the bread this time for something new to do. I will get back with you.

The bread turned out great! We have overcast skies today, so I had a hard time taking a picture to show you how wheaty and colorful the loaves look. In the pictures they look washed out. Maybe tomorrow we will see the sun and I can take a couple more pics. Anyway, I was also baking a roast in the oven, (yes, it isn’t hot here on the coast 🙂 ) I tried to put the first loaf in with the roast turned sideways, I didn’t have a skinny peel so the cookie sheet I was using wouldn’t fit into the oven enough for me to plop my dough onto the stone. I tried jerking it fast anyway, and it fell partway off the stone and I had to try to pull it up onto the stone, it gasped a little and I made it but….gee…not fair.

I did decide to cover the top in the sifted bran particles of the flour I used to make the bread. I spritzed the loaves and coated on the branny stuff. Then I slashed and baked. Here is the boule loaf:

Wheat Nubbins

Here are all three loaves:

Three loaves

Here is how the crumb looks on the boule:

Wheat crumb

The sifted Whole Wheat flour makes a great crumb. The loaves were just slightly over 2 lbs each. I made the recipe using the motherdough and a one night style technique so there was a preferment mixed together in the late evening, and a buildup of the dough in the morning, bulk ferment, and then baking. It is easier to tell when the loaves are proofed when they are not warming up from being in the refrigerator overnight. This recipe turned out great and I will probably write it up and put it into the Special Recipes folder when I get a chance. I am behind because I have not written up the Nickle Rye Recipe yet.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: